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Do you feel whatever you do on LinkedIn you just can’t get the search results you need?

Using the LinkedIn search filters is a great way to narrow your search and find exactly what and who you’re looking for.  However, I will stress that if you upgrade Recruiter Lite or Sales Navigator premium accounts, you can also filter searches by years of experience, functions, seniority level, interests, company size, and when they joined a company, allowing you to perform even more powerful searches.  Here’s an article from Mark Williams explaining Sales Navigator VS Recruiter Lite so worth a read.

Boost your use of LinkedIn as a sales-generation machine, here’s some tips to help get better results when searching for those key decision makers.

How to Run a Search

Running a search is easy, to run a search on LinkedIn you must:

Enter your keyword in the ‘search bar’ at the top of the page Select an option from the drop-down of suggestions that appears as you type, or click the ‘search’ icon to run the search

If you’ve searched for a company, the Company Page will appear in the drop-down, if there is a page created.  You’ll see the following tabs at the top of the search results page:

All People Jobs Content Companies Groups Schools

Select any of the tabs to view search results in that category.

How to run a Boolean Search

Boolean are a little complicated however, they allow us to combine keywords with operators or modifiers such as NOT, AND and OR to produce more appropriate results.  You can run a Boolean search by combining keywords with operators like AND, NOT, and OR.

Here are some ways to use Boolean to construct your search:

Quoted searches

For an exact phrase, enclose the phrase in quotation marks. For example, type “product manager”. You can also use quotation marks if you want to find someone with a multi-word title.

LinkedIn search only supports standard, straight quotation marks (“).

NOT searches

If you want to exclude a search term from your search results type the word NOT (capital letters) beforehand, which obviously limits your search results. For example, “operator NOT supervisor”.

OR searches

Type the word OR for results which include one or more items in a list which will help to. broaden your results. For example, “sales OR marketing OR advertising”.

AND searches

Type the word AND to see results which include all items in that list.  For example, “accountant AND finance AND accounts”.

For a full breakdown of how to run a Boolean search head over to Brynne Tillman who explains further.

There’re no shortcuts when it comes to success other than patience and time and it all comes down to hard work, testing and measuring.

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